Welcome to the Civil Data Dashboard

This dashboard indicates District Civil Court Activity Statistics. Each month the Travis County District Clerk’s Office submits data to the Office of Court Administration (OCA). Please note the OCA Clearance Rate calculation for CPS and IV-D cases are indicated in the FAMILY, CPS and IV-D data information accordingly.

The above mentioned information is available to the public. The purpose of this dashboard is to provide ready accessibility and clarity.

This section contains the New Cases Filed and the Other Cases Reaching Docket like Cases Reactivated and All Other Cases Added.

This section contains the Cases Added by individual Case Type.

This section contains the Age of Cases Disposed. The age is divided into five categories: 3 Months or less, 3 to 6 months, 6 to 12 months,12 to 18 months and over 18 months.

This section contains the Active and Inactive Pending Cases by individual Case Type.

The Clearance Rate is calculated by dividing the Cases Disposed by the Cases Added. The Cases Disposed includes cases closed or disposed as well as Inactivated cases. The Cases Added includes the New Cases Filed, Other Cases Added and the Cases Reactivated.

The Docket Adjustment button reflects cases that were previously disposed or added but were not counted as such at the time. Cases that were disposed but not counted result in a negative Docket Adjustment, while cases that were added but not counted result in a positive Docket Adjustment. Positive or negative Docket Adjustments are always reflected in the Pending caseload, but not reflected in the Clearance Rate. Activating the Docket Adjustment button includes those cases in the Clearance Rate for the Calendar Year, the County Fiscal Year or the State Fiscal Year time periods only. Docket Adjustments account for minor fluctuations in the pending caseload from month to month.

Due to the way that CPS and IV-D data is broken out, some visualizations are not available:

  • Age of Cases Disposed by CPS and IV-D.

This data is presented using two chart types: the Pie chart and the Bar chart. The Pie Charts present data starting in 2011 until the current year. Use the Year and Month filter if you want to look at a specific time period. The Bar Charts present data by Year, Month and Quarter. Use the circular arrow on the bottom right of the Bar chart to switch the time period.

This data visualization was developed by the Travis County Courts Technology Team.

Unless otherwise provided in these rules TRCP 11, no agreement between attorneys or parties touching any suit pending will be enforced unless it be in writing, signed and filed with the papers as part of the record, or unless it be made in open court and entered of record. TRCP 11.

When used in the context of litigation it refers to a court's final determination of a case or issue. May be any case type or matter adjudicated and/or otherwise disposed at the court’s discretion.

In General. A party who seeks to maintain venue of the action in a particular county in reliance upon Section 15.001 (General Rule), Sections 15.011-15.017 (Mandatory Venue), Sections 15.031-15.040 (Permissive Venue), or Sections 15.061 and 15.062 (Multiple Claims), Civil Practice and Remedies Code, has the burden to make proof, as provided in paragraph 3 of this rule, that venue is maintainable in the county of suit. A party who seeks to transfer venue of the action to another specified county under Section 15.001 (General Rule), Sections 15.011-15.017 (Mandatory Venue), Sections 15.031-15.040 (Permissive Venue), or Sections 15.061 and 15.062 (Multiple Claims), Civil Practice and Remedies Code, has the burden to make proof, as provided in paragraph 3 of this rule, that venue is maintainable in the county to which transfer is sought. A party who seeks to transfer venue of the action to another specified county under Sections 15.011-15.017, Civil Practice and Remedies Code on the basis that a mandatory venue provision is applicable and controlling has the burden to make proof, as provided in paragraph 3 of this rule, that venue is maintainable in the county to which transfer is sought by virtue of one or more mandatory venue exceptions. TRCP 87.

Upon such call of the docket, or at any time after a defendant is required to answer, the plaintiff may in term time take judgment by default against such defendant if he has not previously filed an answer, and provided that the citation with the officer's return thereon shall have been on file with the clerk for the length of time required by TRCP 107. TRCP 239.

Directed Verdict (DV)/ Judgment Not Withstanding Verdict (JNOV)

  • JNOV:Judgment notwithstanding the verdict, or JNOV, is a type of judgment as a matter of law (JMOL) that is sometimes rendered at the conclusion of a jury trial. A JNOV is appropriate only if the judge determines that no reasonable jury could have reached the given verdict OR the verdict cannot reasonably be supported by the evidence presented in court, or that is paradoxical or contradicts itself.
  • DV: A directed verdict is a verdict that the judge has either ordered the jury to find or that the judge has taken from the jury and entered without their deliberation. A directed verdict is only used when the evidence for either the plaintiff or defendant in a case is so weak that the law cannot possibly support a finding in favor of that party. In these cases, the directed verdict is entered in favor of the other party. The court may issue a directed verdict either on its own, known as issuing a directed verdict “sua sponte,” or it may issue a directed verdict after either the plaintiff or defendant makes a motion for directed verdict, specifically asking the court to issue a directed verdict in that party’s favor. Usually, the court will not enter a directed verdict until after all the parties have had a chance to present their cases, and it will not consider a motion for directed verdict until at least one party (usually the plaintiff, who ordinarily goes first during trial) has rested its case.

A judge generally plays no role in either a settlement or a verdict. Judges do, however, enter a formal court document called a judgment based on a jury verdict. In a non-jury case, the trial judge will usually make findings of fact and conclusions of law and then enter the final judgment in the case. The judgment of the court shall conform to the pleadings, the nature of the case proved and the verdict, if any, and shall be so framed as to give the party all the relief to which he may be entitled either in law or equity. Provided, that upon motion and reasonable notice the court may render judgment non obstante veredicto if a directed verdict would have been proper, and provided further that the court may, upon like motion and notice, disregard any jury finding on a question that has no support in the evidence. Only one final judgment shall be rendered in any cause except where it is otherwise specially provided by law. Judgment may, in a proper case, be given for or against one or more of several plaintiffs, and for or against one or more of several defendants or intervenors. TRCP 301.

Failure to Appear. A case may be dismissed for want of prosecution on failure of any party seeking affirmative relief to appear for any hearing or trial of which the party had notice. Notice of the court's intention to dismiss and the date and place of the dismissal hearing shall be sent by the clerk to each attorney of record, and to each party not represented by an attorney and whose address is shown on the docket or in the papers on file, by posting same in the United States Postal Service. At the dismissal hearing, the court shall dismiss for want of prosecution unless there is good cause for the case to be maintained on the docket. If the court determines to maintain the case on the docket, it shall render a pretrial order assigning a trial date for the case and setting deadlines for the joining of new parties, all discovery, filing of all pleadings, the making of a response or supplemental responses to discovery and other pretrial matters. The case may be continued thereafter only for valid and compelling reasons specifically determined by court order. Notice of the signing of the order of dismissal shall be given as provided in Rule 306a. Failure to mail notices as required by this rule shall not affect any of the periods mentioned in Rule 306a except as provided in that rule. Non-Compliance With Time Standards. Any case not disposed of within time standards promulgated by the Supreme Court under its Administrative Rules may be placed on a dismissal docket. TRCP 165a

In a non-jury case, the trial judge will usually make findings of fact and conclusions of law and then enter the final judgment in the case. The judgment of the court shall conform to the pleadings, the nature of the case proved and the verdict, if any, and shall be so framed as to give the party all the relief to which he may be entitled either in law or equity. Provided, that upon motion and reasonable notice the court may render judgment non obstante veredicto if a directed verdict would have been proper, and provided further that the court may, upon like motion and notice, disregard any jury finding on a question that has no support in the evidence. Only one final judgment shall be rendered in any cause except where it is otherwise specially provided by law. Judgment may, in a proper case, be given for or against one or more of several plaintiffs, and for or against one or more of several defendants or intervenors. TRCP 301.

At any time before the plaintiff has introduced all of his evidence other than rebuttal evidence, the plaintiff may dismiss a case, or take a non-suit, which shall be entered in the minutes. Notice of the dismissal or non-suit shall be served in accordance with Rule 21a on any party who has answered or has been served with process without necessity of court order. Any dismissal pursuant to this rule shall not prejudice the right of an adverse party to be heard on a pending claim for affirmative relief or excuse the payment of all costs taxed by the clerk. A dismissal under this rule shall have no effect on any motion for sanctions, attorney's fees or other costs, pending at the time of dismissal, as determined by the court. Any dismissal pursuant to this rule which terminates the case shall authorize the clerk to tax court costs against dismissing party unless otherwise ordered by the court. TRCP 162.

  • For Claimant. A party seeking to recover upon a claim, counterclaim, or cross-claim or to obtain a declaratory judgment may, at any time after the adverse party has appeared or answered, move with or without supporting affidavits for a summary judgment in his favor upon all or any part thereof. A summary judgment, interlocutory in character, may be rendered on the issue of liability alone although there is a genuine issue as to amount of damages.
  • For Defending Party. A party against whom a claim, counterclaim, or cross-claim is asserted or a declaratory judgment is sought may, at any time, move with or without supporting affidavits for a summary judgment in his favor as to all or any part thereof. TRCP 166a

Making a selection has the effect of filtering the entire data set by the selected value. To make a selection click on the check box next to the data value you want to know more about. The selected data will turn green, and will also be shown with a check mark. Values compatible with the selection are white and unrelated values are gray. To select more than one item in the same listbox, hold the CTRL key down while selecting additional values.

To undo or redo your last selection, click on the "Back" or "Forward" button in the left corner of the page. To clear selections click on the "Clear Selections button" in the left corner of the page.

Click on the caption of a listbox and start typing your searchterm. Use ENTER to select all corresponding values or pick single ones with your mouse.

If available, click on a cycle button or drill down button to display or drill down to the next variable in the chart.

Civil

All non-tax civil cases not clearly identifiable as belonging in one of the preceding categories. Include cases appealing the finding of a department or administrative agency. Examples include state agency administrative appeals, appraisal review, class action, and mandamus.

All civil cases associated with criminal matters, including bond forfeiture, expunction, nondisclosure, occupational license, seizure and forfeiture, contempt (in criminal cases only), extradition, and writ of habeas corpus (in criminal cases only) cases.

Cases involving a buyer of goods or services bringing a suit against the seller for failure either to deliver said goods or services or to honor a warranty as promised in an expressed or implied contract. Also, cases involving a seller of goods or services bringing a suit against a buyer for failure to pay for said goods or services as promised in an expressed or implied contract (debt collection). Examples include breach of contract, DTPA, sworn accounts, foreclosure, mechanic’s liens and insurance claims.

Cases that allege misconduct or negligence by a person or entity in the medical profession acting in a professional capacity, thereby causing physical or financial harm.

All cases for damages associated in any way with a motor vehicle (automobile, truck, motorcycle, etc.), with or without accompanying personal injury. Examples include personal injury, property damage, and wrongful death cases that involve motor vehicles.

Cases that allege misconduct or negligence by a person or entity not in the medical profession acting in a professional capacity, thereby causing physical or financial harm. Examples include breach of fiduciary duty, legal malpractice and accounting malpractice.

All other cases, not involving asbestos or silica, involving the alleged responsibility of the manufacturer or seller of an article for an injury caused to a person or property by a defect in, or the condition of, the article sold or an alleged breach of duty to provide suitable instructions to prevent injury. Examples include breast implant and pharmaceuticals.

Cases involving the alleged responsibility of the manufacturer or seller for an injury caused to a person or property by exposure to, or ingestion of, asbestos or silica or an alleged breach of duty to provide suitable instructions to prevent injury.

All other cases involving a dispute over an agreement, express or implied, between two parties. Examples include employment discrimination, landlord and tenant disputes, whistleblower, and wrongful termination.

All other cases not falling into categories 1 through 5 above alleging an injury or wrong committed against a person, their reputation, or their property by a party who either did something that he was obligated not to do or failed to do something that he was obligated to do. Examples include defamation, negligence, personal injury, and wrongful death.

All other cases involving real property. Examples include easements, partition, zoning, and title disputes.

Suits by a unit of government or a corporation with the power of eminent domain for the taking of private land for public use; or cases in which a property owner challenges the amount of remuneration offered by the government for the taking of a parcel of land.

Suits brought by governmental taxing entities against an individual or business for the collection of taxes. Examples include taxes on cigarettes, diesel, franchise, hotel, mixed beverage, motor fuels, and sales.

Family

Cases filed under Ch. 162 of the Family Code requesting the establishment of a new, permanent relationship of parent and child between persons not having that relationship naturally.

Includes all cases filed under the Family Code: Changes of name (Ch. 45, Family Code); Adult adoptions (Sec. 152.502, Family Code); Removal of disability of minority (Ch. 31, Family Code); Removal of disability of minority for marriage (Section 2.103, Family Code); Suits for parental liability for damages caused by conduct of child (Ch. 41, Family Code); and suits for liability for interference with possession of a child (Ch. 42, Family Code).

Cases filed under Ch. 262 of the Family Code on behalf of the Department of Family and Protective Services; a motion in aid of investigation filed under Section 261.303 of the Family Code; a motion to participate filed under Section 264.203 of the Family Code; or a civil action filed by the Department requesting a determination of an at-risk child under Section 264.303 of the Family Code.

Suits brought by a party to a marriage to dissolve the marriage pursuant to Ch. 6, Family Code that also include a suit affecting the parent-child relationship due to the existence of children born or adopted of the marriage who are under 18 years of age or who are otherwise entitled to support as provided by Ch. 154, Family Code.

Cases involving issues of custody, support, paternity, visitation (by parents, grandparents or other family members) that do not involve a current or previously decided divorce/marriage dissolution case. Examples include paternity, and voluntary legitimation.

Post-judgment suits or motions requesting the enforcement of a final order, including, but not limited to:

  • Motions filed pursuant to Ch. 157, Family Code to enforce a final order for conservatorship, child support, possession of or access to a child, property provisions, injunctions, or other provisions of a final order (e.g., motions for contempt; motions for enforcement of judgments or prior orders; motions to revoke community supervision/probation for failure to pay child support);
  • Suits to enforce a divorce or annulment decree filed pursuant to Ch. 9, Family Code (petition for enforcement of property division; petitions to divide assets not divided on divorce or annulment; post-decree qualified domestic relations orders)
  • Suits to enforce spousal maintenance filed pursuant to Ch. 8, Family Code.

Post-judgment suits or motions filed pursuant to Subchapter B, Ch. 156, Family Code, for modification of an order that provides for the conservatorship of, possession of, or determination of residence of a child (e.g., motions to modify conservatorship (custody), motions to modify right to determine primary residence of child, motions for further orders of the court).

Post-judgment suits or motions requesting modification of orders not involving custody of a child, including, but not limited to:

  • Suits filed pursuant to Subchapter B, Ch. 156, Family Code for modification of an order that provides for the access to a child (motions to modify visitation privileges; motions to modify rights, privileges and duties of conservator);
  • Suits filed pursuant to Subchapter C, Ch. 156, Family Code for modification of an order that provides for the support of a child (motions to modify or set child support; motions to terminate wage withholding; motions for further orders of the court, child support arrearage, and reduction of child support);
  • Suits filed pursuant to Section 8.057, Family Code for modification of an order that provides for spousal maintenance (petition to terminate/modify order/writ of income withholding).

Cases involving issues of custody, support, paternity, visitation (by parents, grandparents or other family members) that do not involve a current or previously decided divorce/marriage dissolution case. Examples include paternity, and voluntary legitimation.

Cases filed under Ch. 82, Family Code, requesting an order designed to limit or eliminate contact between two or more family/household members or individuals involved in a dating relationship.

Cases filed under Ch. 161 of the Family Code requesting that the court extinguish the legal relationship of parent and child. Examples are private parental rights terminations.

Suits or motions filed by the Title IV-D agency (Office of the Attorney General) pursuant to Chs. 156, 157 or 159, Family Code, to enforce and/or modify a child support obligation. Examples include child support reimbursement, and retroactive child support.

Cases filed by the Title IV-D Agency (Office of Attorney General) requesting a determination of parentage under Ch. 160, Family Code and the setting of a child support obligation. These cases may also involve custody and visitation issues.

Cases filed by the Title IV-D Agency (Office of Attorney General) requesting the setting of a child support obligation where the parentage of the child has been established by an Acknowledgment of Paternity or the child was born during the marriage. These cases may also involve custody and visitation issues including AG.

Cases filed by the Title IV-D Agency (Office of the Attorney General) seeking to establish a Texas child support order. The issue of paternity may be addressed. UIFSA cases are distinguished by the fact that not all parties reside in Texas. Issues of custody and visitation are not generally involved.